** Please check out my tribute page to two of my Civil War relatives who never made it home **

Monday, April 27, 2015

April 27, 2015



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


Today’s little piece of Gettysburg is a photo of one of the 12-pounder Napoleons from Stevens’ Battery. Can you figure out why I like this picture so much? It’s ‘authentic’ (meaning a soldier from 1863 could look at it and not see anything out of place), it’s got a cannon, there are rolling mountains in the distance, and there’s blue sky. I mean, what else could anybody ask for? (Except maybe the chance to fire it, but we all know that’s not going to happen . . .)


According to the website Gettysburg Stone Sentinels, 2 artillerists were killed and 13 were wounded while operating and defending this battery. Of the wounded, it appears 2 died. The deaths were: Pvt. Sylvester L. Brown, Pvt. Charles Bryant, Pvt. Sullivan Luce, and Pvt. William H. Wydner. If you visit this battery, please take a moment to think of them.


**HONORED TODAY**

CPL. ISAAC BROWN NEWCOMB, JR.
Co. C, 22nd Massachusetts Infantry

Born November 20, 1820 --- Died July 02, 1863 at age 42

Cpl. Newcomb enlisted in September 1861. In civilian life he worked as a piano polisher. He married Margaret, who sadly died in 1858, and with her he had five children, only two of whom survived (Mary F. born 1849 and Hattie G. born 1857. Mary Jane was born in 1842 and died in 1843, Margaret L. was born and died in 1848, and Charles S. was born and died in 1855. Cpl. Newcomb later married a lady named Salome. He was buried at Gettysburg National Cemetery.


(c) 2012-2015 Skies of Blue and Gray

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

April 22, 2015



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


Here’s a different perspective of East Cemetery Hill and the iconic Evergreen Cemetery gatehouse, taken from Wainwright Avenue. I particularly like this view . . . Hays’ Louisiana Tigers must have a similar view as they trekked up over the picturesque rolling meadows opposite the hill. And of course there’s artillery (albeit hard to see). The prominent statuary monument to the right of the gatehouse memorializes the 4th Ohio Infantry. Now all we have to do is get rid of the power lines . . .


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. JOAB BAILIFF
Co. A, 7th Tennessee Infantry

Born April 06, 1836 --- Died July 16, 1863 at age 27

Pvt. Bailiff enlisted in May 1861 and reenlisted in April 1862. He was married to Elizabeth and was the father of Mary (age 9 in 1863), James (age 8), Nancy (age 4), and John (age 2). Some sources also list a child Thomas, who, if still living in 1863, would have been 7.


(c) 2012-2015 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, April 20, 2015

April 20, 2015



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **

I suffer from a rare (though apparently not so rare among Civil War buffs) condition known as artillery withdrawal. Here’s some photos to cheer me (and hopefully you) up! These particular pieces are from Wheeler’s New York battery along Howard Avenue. The cannon tubes were manufactured by Phoenix Iron Co. On the top photo you can see the monument to Wheeler’s Battery, the 13th New York Independent Battery, and on the bottom, part of Oak Ridge and Oak Hill. Wheeler’s artillery would have been dueling with Page’s Battery which was positioned down over the slope of Oak Hill, as well as blowing holes through the lines of Confederate infantry.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. PHILONAS KINSMAN
Co. K, 7th Wisconsin Infantry

Born July 07, 1812 --- Died July 26, 1863

Despite being over the age considered ideal for enlistment, Pvt. Kinsman joined the Union cause in August 1861 and fought bravely for nearly two years. He left behind a wife, Adeline, two grown children (Henry, age 21, and Sarah, age 18) as well as two minor children, Rosina (age 13) and a daughter whose name I do not know (age 9). He and his wife also lost two children in infancy. Pvt. Kinsman was wounded on the first day of battle and lingered for nearly a month. He was later buried at Gettysburg National Cemetery.


(c) 2012-2015 Skies of Blue and Gray

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

April 15, 2015



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **

Pardee Field on a Spring Morning


I love being alone in Gettysburg, especially when warmer temperatures and blue skies are involved. This shot of Pardee Field is one I haven’t often seen . . . taken near the 1st Maryland CSA monument and showing Geary Avenue and the 147th Pennsylvania “star” monument, it gives a good overview of the ground “Maryland” Steuart’s Southern boys had to cross on July 03rd. I like the tree shadow at center, as well as the hint of rock wall at the bottom. If you visited Gettysburg before the field was mowed down, you would have seen a much different view. I’m so grateful that the National Park Service and Gettysburg-loving volunteers have worked so hard to keep the park as beautiful as it is. :-)


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. JOHN KEELS
Co. H, 15th Alabama Infantry

Born 1829/31 --- Died July 1863 (exact date unknown)

Pvt. Keels’ story is one of true pathos. Married to a lady named Elizabeth, with a daughter Courtney Ann (four years old) and a son James (two), he was mortally wounded during the struggle for Little Round Top. The bullet pierced his windpipe and he must have known he didn’t have long to live. Yet something drove him, and he climbed Big Round Top (yes, Big Round Top) with such a serious wound in the hopes of being rescued. Sadly, he was placed in a field hospital but succumbed to his injuries. No one is certain where Pvt. Keels is buried. He may be at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.


(c) 2012-2015 Skies of Blue and Gray