** Please check out my tribute page to two of my Civil War relatives who never made it home **

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

May 25, 2016



 ** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


This is the view from the Pennsylvania Memorial facing Hancock Avenue, looking across Cemetery Ridge toward Emmitsburg Road. The white structure in the center distance is the Daniel Klingel farmhouse. The cannon at right is part of Thomas’s Battery, also known as Battery C of the 4TH U. S. Artillery. Notice the fences of various configurations and the nice contrast of greens, browns, and blues; autumn in Gettysburg is almost magical, which I’m sure anyone who’s visited at that time of year well knows.


**HONORED TODAY**

3RD LT. WESLEY LEWIS BATTLE
Co. D, 37TH North Carolina Infantry

Born October 13, 1843 --- Died August 23, 1863 at age 19
 
3RD Lt. Battle enlisted in July 1862 and was transferred to the 37TH North Carolina in January 1863. He received a mortal wound during battle and was taken to Camp Letterman, where he underwent an amputation. A second surgery on the 23RD of August resulted in death. Lt. Battle was buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh, or possibly at Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A photo can be found here.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, May 23, 2016

May 23, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The road less traveled.

I hardly ever see any other living souls at East Cavalry Field although it’s a pretty interesting place. The beautiful Rummel farm, a handful of impressive monuments, and the rows of artillery are enough to warrant a visit, and if you’re the sort who likes solitary, peaceful battlefield strolls, this is definitely the place. I recall many times that we took advantage of the pull-off located just beyond this point to have an in-car picnic lunch while looking out over the fields.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. NICHOLAUS YOUNG
Co. G, 26TH Wisconsin Infantry

Died August 08, 1863
 
Pvt. Young enlisted in August 1862. He was mortally wounded in battle on the 1ST of July, suffering a fracture of the thigh, and died at Camp Letterman over a month later. It is thought that he was buried at Gettysburg National Cemetery with a stone that says “Lieut. Martin Young”. Many of the old stones at this cemetery are in error concerning names and sometimes states.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

May 18, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **

video

My first time posting a video on Blogger :-) This isn’t necessarily battlefield-oriented (though troops of both sides did use Sach’s Covered Bridge during and after the battle) but is more suitable for a little morning relaxation. Marsh Creek is always so peaceful no matter the season or time of day, and it’s always a great place for quiet reflection. (Unless you happen to be in the presence of unnaturally loud people or the quintessential obnoxious ghost-hunter . . .


**HONORED TODAY**

CPL. RICHARD LEWIS MCLAURIN
Co. A, 18TH Mississippi Infantry

Born February 28, 1838 --- Died July 12, 1863 at age 25
 
Cpl. McLaurin (also spelled McLaurine) was married to Anna and had two little boys, Edwin (who was 3 when his father died) and Lewis (who was 1). Richard was later buried at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, sharing space with many of his comrades in gray who died either during or as a result of the battle of Gettysburg.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, May 16, 2016

May 16, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


Love him or hate him, you can’t deny that Abraham Lincoln played a large part in the Gettysburg story, and in American Civil War history. You might think that the Soldiers’ National Cemetery, the Adams County Library, the David Wills House, and the visitor center are the only places to find his distinctive mug (and I also discovered that there is a Lincoln statue at Gettysburg College, which I have yet to see), but he also has a permanent place at the Pennsylvania Memorial. No, he’s not a Pennsylvanian, but was influential enough to be included. This statue was created by J. Otto Schweizer and is one of a handful of sculptures that pay tribute to men from or important to the state of Pennsylvania during the battle of Gettysburg.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. GEORGE NIXON
Co. B, 73RD Ohio Infantry

Born July 01, 1821 --- Died July 10/14, 1863

Pvt. Nixon marked his 42ND birthday during the battle of Gettysburg and was mortally wounded two days later. Married to Margaret, he was the father of Martha (who was 19), David (17), Samuel (16), Margaret (14), Sarah (12), William (9), Boston (7), Hiram (5), and Elihu (3). Pvt. Nixon sadly died after being rescued by a comrade who risked his life to save him. He was first buried at the George Spangler farm and later at Gettysburg’s National Cemetery. A photo can be found here.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray