** Please check out my tribute page to two of my Civil War relatives who never made it home **

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

February 10, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


Sometimes random, seemingly unimportant photos convey the beauty and simplicity of Gettysburg best. This fence is located along the path known as the Point of Woods, which begins near the Virginia State Memorial along Confederate Avenue. You can see a shaft of sunlight hitting a portion of the rails at left, while the rest of the fence is bathed in shadow. This is a very calm and peaceful place --- at least before the busloads arrive, and the markers and benches at the end of the path provide a nice respite from the busyness of the battlefield.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. JAMES P. NORTON
Co. C, 8TH Alabama Infantry

Died January 11, 1864
                                       
Pvt. Norton enlisted in May 1861 and was a clerk. He was mortally wounded at Gettysburg on July 2ND and taken prisoner two days later, originally being treated at Camp Letterman. When he was brought to a hospital in York, doctors refused to treat a Rebel soldier, and he was transferred elsewhere. He died after six months of suffering. 


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, February 8, 2016

February 08, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The Eternal Light Peace Memorial stands like a beacon on Oak Hill, reminding visitors of the division that once was and the unity which again cemented America into a great nation. Seen here on a *very* cold February morning a few years back, its eternal flame is hidden to the naked eye, but was certainly present. It’s fairly rare to climb the steps of the memorial without sharing them with a host of others, usually a bus full of eager tourists from places unknown. If you have the chance to explore the monument and its surrounding artillery pieces without distraction, take it!

**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. ISAIAH VALENTINE EATON
Co. D, 4TH Maine Infantry

Born November 27, 1830 --- Died August 18, 1863 at age 32
                                       
Pvt. Eaton, a fisherman from Deer Isle, previously served in the 38TH New York Infantry, and was transferred in late June 1863, just a handful of days before the army arrived at Gettysburg. He was survived by his wife Susan, 12-year-old Lydia, 9-year-old Solomon, 8-year-old Lovina, 5-year-old Susan, 3-year-old Sarah (listed in some records as Louisa), and 1-year-old Isaiah. A seventh child, Jonah, was born about January 1864, sadly dying about 11 months later. Pvt. Eaton is buried at Gettysburg’s National Cemetery.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

February 03, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The capstone which completes Battery B’s marker is perhaps the newest “monument” on the Gettysburg battlefield. Battery B of the 1ST Pennsylvania Light Artillery, also known as Cooper’s Battery, was involved in many well-known battles such as Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run/Manassas, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg in 1862, and Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863. Their service record stretches out through the rest of the war, ending at the Grand Review of May 1865. On this particular photo you can see the crest of East Cemetery Hill, the swell of Culp’s Hill (center), and the less-impressive Stevens’ Knoll (far right, known during the battle as McKnight’s Hill).


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. JOHN C. FREEMAN
Co. E, 6TH North Carolina Infantry

Born 1840 --- Died August 21, 1863 at age 23
                                       
Pvt. Freeman’s wounding at Gettysburg was not his first brush with death: he was wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill in July 1862, then again at Antietam/Sharpsburg just two months later. At Gettysburg, however, the leg wound was severe, and necessitated his being sent to the army hospital at Camp Letterman. He failed to recover, and was later buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, February 1, 2016

February 01, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The 12TH/44TH New York Infantry “castle” monument on Little Round Top has always been one of my favorites. The climb is a little steep but relatively easy, and the views . . . amazing. I liked this particular angle, standing at the bottom and looking up. You can see the 5TH Corps’ distinctive symbol at the very top. If you’ve been inside the castle, you’ll know that you never actually go inside the tower . . . those windows at the top are inaccessible. Visitors come out on the observation deck below this point. You’re likely to share the deck with a good many other people at any given time, and at dusk or after dark when the ghost hunters are out in full force, forget about having the place to yourself!


**HONORED TODAY**

CPL. MATTHEW GEORGE ALLEGAR
Co. G, 142ND Pennsylvania Infantry

Born November 14, 1831 --- Died August 06, 1863 at age 31
                                       
Cpl. Allegar enlisted in August 1862. His family consisted of wife Lucinda, son Truman (born 1855) and daughter Maryann (born 1860). Tragedy visited his family in many other forms as well; his brother John was killed in May 1862 in Virginia, while another brother, Jacob, died in August 1862 in that same state. Cpl. Allegar himself was mortally wounded and sent to Camp Letterman, and after death was later buried at the Reformed Dutch Church Burial Ground in Bushkill, Pennsylvania.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray