** Please check out my tribute page to two of my Civil War relatives who never made it home **

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

June 22, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The word emblazoned on the crest of Little Round Top’s 140TH New York Infantry monument represents a ideal which Civil War soldiers strove to attain. Colonel Patrick O’Rorke’s boys did their duty to the point of death, marching into place on this small hill without question, surging down over the slope to drive back the foe. The monument states that 26 men were killed. These were Pvt. David W. Allen, Pvt. John Allen, Cpl. Robert Blair, Pvt. Jacob Boxlor, Pvt. Philip Buchner, Pvt. Stephen Carkeek, Sgt. James G. Clapp, Pvt. Samuel Cohler, Pvt. Justus Eisenberg, Cpl. John A. Evans, Sgt. John B. Heindl, Pvt. Jeremiah Keenan, Pvt. George Kleinhaus, Pvt. Ferdinand Neuman, Pvt. George Pfefer, Pvt. Robert Shields, Pvt. Charles Speisberger, Pvt. George V. Steele, Pvt. Kinsey Stotle, Pvt. George Strobridge, Pvt. Huburt C. Taylor, Pvt. Ross Thomas, Pvt. William Warner, Pvt. Sanford O. Webb, Cpl. Theodore B. Whipple, and Pvt. John Zuller. Others later died of their wounds.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. LESTER L. BAIRD
Co. H, 14TH Vermont Infantry

Born June 22, 1822 --- Died July 17, 1863 at age 41

Pvt. Baird enlisted September 1862 and was a millwright by trade. Married to Lucy, his children were Martha (aged 14 at her father’s death), Maria (aged 11), Elwin (aged 8), and Lucy (aged 5). Pvt. Baird was mortally wounded July 3RD and succumbed to his injuries 2 weeks later. He was buried at Gettysburg National Cemetery.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Monday, June 20, 2016

June 20, 2016



** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The High Water Mark is one of the few places on the field where you can see not only cannon but also caissons. This particular set is located across Hancock Avenue from the Angle, and in the distance is the Peter Frey farm. While the farmhouse is original, the barn sadly is not. Only the power-lines along Cemetery Ridge give any indication of the modern era.


**HONORED TODAY**

2ND LT. WILLIAM F. D. HICKS
Co. B, 14TH Tennessee Infantry

Born 1835 --- Died August 10, 1863 at age 28

2ND Lt. Hicks enlisted in May 1861. Mortally wounded at Gettysburg, he was captured and taken to the hospital at Chester, Pennsylvania, where he later died. He was buried at Philadelphia National Cemetery.


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

June 08, 2016

**Next post will be Monday, June 20th**


** This blog published Mondays and Wednesdays **


The Moses McLean (or McClean) farm at the base of Oak Ridge is one of those farms I always noticed and admired on the Gettysburg battlefield but didn’t know much about. Today I finally did a little research and came up with this: The farm was owned by Moses McLean (a lawyer) who rented it out to David and Harriet Beams. A “J. Martin” is also listed as having been a tenant. The farm was vacant during the battle as Harriet and her child fled for safety, and Alabamians put up a strong guard on the property. New Yorkers from the 11TH Corps sought to gain control of the farm on the afternoon of July 1ST. Years later, Moses McLean sought restitution for the damage done to his property . . . he asked $1,138, a very high price in those days. Unlike many Gettysburg civilians who filed similar claims, he received what he had asked for.


**HONORED TODAY**

PVT. DAVID TEN EYCK
Co. B, 84TH New York Infantry

Born 1842 --- Died July 01, 1863


Pvt. Ten Eyck’s unusual name is of Dutch extraction. Born in Baltimore, he likely had Confederate relatives, which must have made family situations rather tricky. He enlisted in September 1862 and was a hat trimmer by trade. He is described as being 6’3½” tall with dark hair and blue eyes. 


(c) 2012-2016 Skies of Blue and Gray